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A Healthy Waist is Less than Half Your Height

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Sep 8, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Leonardo da Vinci’s globally recognized illustration “Vitruvian Man”, created around 1490 AD, is an inspirational reminder that human bodies are amazingly symmetrical, beautiful and functional. For example, human arm span is the same length as body height, forming a square in his illustration. At the center of a circle, circumscribed by outstretched arms and legs, is the navel. The navel is also located at the “golden ratio” point along the human body. The golden ratio, a measure of symmetry and natural beauty famous among mathematicians and architects (symbolized by the Greek letter phi), can be found throughout the body when analyzing the lengths of related body parts, body dimensions, and facial features. In fact, symmetry and special ratios can be found throughout the natural world, and in the physical laws of nature and the universe.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Should You be Taking CoQ10?

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jul 28, 2016 2:39:04 PM

CO…what???  That’s a common response when I ask a patient to start taking Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone (or in activated form ubiquinol)!  Yes CoQ10 has a funny name but your body needs it to produce energy in every cell. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

5 Ways to Increase Your Hidden Superhero (HDL Cholesterol)

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD & Kristy Consalvo, MBA on Jul 14, 2016 11:20:00 AM

Have you ever felt you have a superpower inside of you? Well, you do! Every single one of us does—it’s our High Density Lipoprotein (HDL).  What makes HDL a superpower? HDL particles in the blood- helps to clear out excess cholesterol from your arteries helping to reduce your risk of forming a blockage which could lead to a heart attack or stroke.1

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Minnesota Coronary Experiment—Trying To See In A Blizzard?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 19, 2016 2:20:07 PM

I was startled last week by new research study findings that have unexpectedly “transported” me back to my own origins and fundamental assumptions. This study originated in Minnesota in the 1960’s—and so did I. The newly published results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment, conducted nearly a half-century ago, have made headlines and raised uncertainty and controversy about how dietary intake causes heart disease and atherosclerosis.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

5 Facts About Dietary Cholesterol

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Feb 25, 2016 11:25:00 AM


After years of avoiding steak, eggs and ice cream as part your quest for maintaining good cholesterol levels, now you are finding yourself ready to indulge.  Are the new guidelines too good to be true?  Consider these 5 undisputable facts before you add more butter to your bread.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

How to Buy Supplements: 5 Rules of the Road...

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jan 28, 2016 11:30:00 AM

                      Photo Credit:Niloo/Shutterstock.com

When my patients ask about buying a supplement suggested in the office, a LONG, passionate conversation ensues! But don’t worry, I’ll save you time and boil it down to 5 main rules on how to buy supplements. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

What is the Best Diet for You?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Nov 12, 2015 6:00:00 AM

About 15 years ago, the Atkins Diet was starting to catch on like wild fire. I first learned about it from a doctor friend who said he was losing weight by eating mostly meat, cheese, and eggs. “You can’t lose weight on a high-fat diet” I insisted, but there really wasn’t much evidence to back me up. At that time, there were more than 1,000 diet books on the market which begged the question --Is one diet better than all the rest?

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science