ingoodhealth-1.jpg

Sleep Deprivation and Its Link to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Jan 26, 2018 11:03:00 AM

Losing sleep over sleep deprivation? On average, Americans live for approximately 75 years, of which they spend about 25 years sleeping. There is perhaps no other single activity that preoccupies a human life as much as sleep does.

Sleep is a universal trait in the animal kingdom and is likely an evolutionary survival tool. It is speculated that sleep offers adaptive inactivity to ensure that species are not active and exposed to predators when they are most vulnerable. Other theories include energy conservation theory, restorative theory (time for the brain to repair itself) and brain plasticity theory (sleep correlated to bodily changes such as growing children needing more sleep than grown adults). Although there is no consistent empirical data to pin any of these theories to the evolutionary purpose of sleep, biological truth about the purpose of sleep is likely hidden among all of these theories. What we do know, is that sleep is not, however, a state of unconsciousness as envisioned in the early days, but is a highly metabolically active state.

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science, About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

“Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork???”

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Nov 24, 2017 9:05:00 AM

Recently, I attended the Cardiometabolic Health Congress in Boston and had the opportunity to sit in on a talk given by an interventional cardiologist, Stephen Devries MD, FACC from Gaples Institute of Integrative Cardiology in Deerfield, IL. His presentation was titled “Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork.” I went into the presentation expecting to learn about the new developments in interventional cardiology and how diagnostic testing may be beneficial to an interventional cardiologist. Instead, I was subjected to the idea that the most effective tool in the hands of an interventional cardiologist is, in fact, non-FDA regulated therapeutic agents such as blueberries, spinach, salmon and olive oil. Sure, growing up we are all told to eat our veggies and limit our candy consumption, but an interventional cardiologist rolling out these time tested clichés as interventional therapy? This was surprising.

Read More

Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

Rethink your Drink!—5 Reasons to Avoid Artificially Sweetened Beverages

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Aug 18, 2017 10:50:00 AM


“To lose weight, cut out the sugar-filled beverages and substitute with diet drinks.”  This statement makes sense to most Americans. However, a recent
study found the opposite. Artificial sweeteners were not helpful in the battle of losing weight and routine consumption may be associated with increased risk for diabetes and heart disease.  Researchers think that artificial sweeteners have a negative effect on our metabolism and our healthy intestinal microbiome. It’s also thought that the very sweet-tasting nature of artificial sweeteners makes people crave even more sweet foods and therefore leads to excess calories and weight gain. 

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Diabetes – The Problem

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Jun 15, 2017 11:30:00 AM

Right now there is a national effort to prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes in the U.S has been increasing throughout the decades and is expected to continue increasing significantly. 29 million people have type 2 diabetes—that’s 1 out of 11 people.1

Even more concerning is that 86 million U.S adults have prediabetes, and 9 out of 10 of them don’t know they do. It’s clear that this is a big challenge we are facing, and without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.1

Read More

Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Four Lifestyle Factors That Can Reduce Your Risk For CVD

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on May 18, 2017 11:30:00 PM

Eating right and regularly exercising are not the only ways to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. These four lifestyle factors play an essential role as well.

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Mediterranean Diet Improves Heart Risk and HDL Function

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 20, 2017 11:30:00 AM


The Mediterranean Diet is a proven eating strategy for good heart health. A recent study shows the health benefits may be partly due to improvements in HDL particle function.1

What is HDL particle function and why is this important?

 

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Bridging the Racial Gap in Heart Disease

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Feb 24, 2017 11:00:00 AM


Each February we celebrate both Black History Month and Heart Month. This is a great opportunity to reaffirm the importance of working together as a society that fights against avoidable deaths including premature heart disease. In African Americans, avoidable deaths from premature heart disease are especially common and death from all cardiovascular disease is 33% higher than in the general population. Ethnic minority populations face barriers to heart disease diagnosis and care, receive lower quality treatment, and experience worse health outcomes than the general population. This is not acceptable, and I would like to applaud and celebrate those individuals and organizations that are working hard to help understand and bridge the racial gap in heart disease.

Read More

Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

Playing the Hand You’re Dealt: Genetics vs. Lifestyle Choices

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Feb 23, 2017 10:01:00 AM

I recently read about a new Healthy Lifestyle study in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine.1  When a top medical journal reports such a study it tends to strongly influence the way doctors and other experts think about the value of “Lifestyle Medicine.” I’m excited to declare that the new findings strongly support the critically important role of healthy lifestyle habits for preventing premature cardiovascular disease, especially in people with an increased “genetic risk.”

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

NLA Guidelines – Sorting Fact from Fiction

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Feb 9, 2017 10:34:00 AM

With nutrition information everywhere, it can be hard to tell fact from fiction.  Scientific breakthroughs happen from time to time, but they are very rarely “breakthrough” despite the sensational news headlines.  Making sense of these exaggerated news bites can be difficult for most.  In fact, the National Lipid Association, a well-respected organization of scientific professionals, just released their version of nutrition education materials1 to help healthcare providers help patients make better nutrition choices.   This marks a significant step forward in combatting nutrition mythology and in helping healthcare professionals provide legitimate nutrition education to their patients. 

I’ve always believed in the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Silly).   There is lots of sound information out there that is well supported by research, but we also see a lot of not so great or even downright harmful information being passed around.  Here are a few strategies I have shared with my clients over the years to help them detect the truth from the fiction:

Read More

Topics: Clinical and Science

4 Ways to Get Healthy Arteries and a Healthy Heart

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Sep 22, 2016 11:29:00 AM


 ©2015 Boston Heart Diagnostics Corporation. All rights reserved.

National cholesterol education month is a great time to review why controlling blood cholesterol levels is so important to keeping a healthy heart.  Several major risk factors for heart disease have long been identified and when present together create a perfect storm that can wreak havoc in the lining of the arteries of your heart. When cells of the lining of an artery become damaged, openings are created.  It is this initial damage that allows the excess cholesterol in your blood to enter the lining of the artery and grow into plaque. Overtime, worsening plaque narrows or blocks blood flow and can lead to a heart attack.  Preventing damage to the lining of arteries is the key to avoiding heart disease, but also to avoiding a recurring event if you already have heart disease.  Here are 4 steps you can take toward maintaining healthy arteries and a healthy heart. 

Read More

Topics: Clinical and Science, About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

How to Reduce Your Sugar Intake [Infographic]

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Sep 15, 2016 11:14:00 AM

Recent headlines suggest the sugar industry may have influenced researchers to publish articles to minimize the effects of sugar on heart health and instead, shift the attention to saturated fat as the culprit for heart disease1.  Today, the scientific industry is looking more closely at sugar, in fact, in January the U.S. Dietary Guidelines were released with a new recommendation to consume less than 10% of your calories from added sugars.    So what do these guidelines mean for your diet and how can you reduce your sugar intake?

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

A Healthy Waist is Less than Half Your Height

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Sep 8, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Leonardo da Vinci’s globally recognized illustration “Vitruvian Man”, created around 1490 AD, is an inspirational reminder that human bodies are amazingly symmetrical, beautiful and functional. For example, human arm span is the same length as body height, forming a square in his illustration. At the center of a circle, circumscribed by outstretched arms and legs, is the navel. The navel is also located at the “golden ratio” point along the human body. The golden ratio, a measure of symmetry and natural beauty famous among mathematicians and architects (symbolized by the Greek letter phi), can be found throughout the body when analyzing the lengths of related body parts, body dimensions, and facial features. In fact, symmetry and special ratios can be found throughout the natural world, and in the physical laws of nature and the universe.

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Should You be Taking CoQ10?

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jul 28, 2016 2:39:04 PM

CO…what???  That’s a common response when I ask a patient to start taking Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone (or in activated form ubiquinol)!  Yes CoQ10 has a funny name but your body needs it to produce energy in every cell. 

Read More

Topics: Clinical and Science, Health and Wellness

5 Ways to Increase Your Hidden Superhero (HDL Cholesterol)

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD & Kristy Consalvo, MBA on Jul 14, 2016 11:20:00 AM

Have you ever felt you have a superpower inside of you? Well, you do! Every single one of us does—it’s our High Density Lipoprotein (HDL).  What makes HDL a superpower? HDL particles in the blood- helps to clear out excess cholesterol from your arteries helping to reduce your risk of forming a blockage which could lead to a heart attack or stroke.1

Read More

Topics: Clinical and Science, Health and Wellness

Minnesota Coronary Experiment—Trying To See In A Blizzard?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 19, 2016 2:20:07 PM

I was startled last week by new research study findings that have unexpectedly “transported” me back to my own origins and fundamental assumptions. This study originated in Minnesota in the 1960’s—and so did I. The newly published results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment, conducted nearly a half-century ago, have made headlines and raised uncertainty and controversy about how dietary intake causes heart disease and atherosclerosis.

Read More

Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

5 Facts About Dietary Cholesterol

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Feb 25, 2016 11:25:00 AM


After years of avoiding steak, eggs and ice cream as part your quest for maintaining good cholesterol levels, now you are finding yourself ready to indulge.  Are the new guidelines too good to be true?  Consider these 5 undisputable facts before you add more butter to your bread.

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

How to Buy Supplements: 5 Rules of the Road...

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jan 28, 2016 11:30:00 AM

                      Photo Credit:Niloo/Shutterstock.com

When my patients ask about buying a supplement suggested in the office, a LONG, passionate conversation ensues! But don’t worry, I’ll save you time and boil it down to 5 main rules on how to buy supplements. 

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

What is the Best Diet for You?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Nov 12, 2015 6:00:00 AM

About 15 years ago, the Atkins Diet was starting to catch on like wild fire. I first learned about it from a doctor friend who said he was losing weight by eating mostly meat, cheese, and eggs. “You can’t lose weight on a high-fat diet” I insisted, but there really wasn’t much evidence to back me up. At that time, there were more than 1,000 diet books on the market which begged the question --Is one diet better than all the rest?

Read More

Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science