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How "Diabetes Reversal" Works

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Mar 27, 2018 9:21:00 AM

Do you have type 2 diabetes? Perhaps you’re at risk for it, or someone you care about has type 2 diabetes. Approximately 12% of adults have type 2 diabetes, including approximately 25% of individuals over age 65 years.1 Diabetes is a leading killer throughout the United States, and is on the rise.

But there is good news—type 2 diabetes is reversible. Although it is not currently curable, many individuals have achieved remission or near-remission of their diabetes, meaning that their blood sugar levels are normal or nearly normal without diabetes medication.2, 3  “Diabetes Reversal” is the process of working toward remission or as close to remission as possible. So, how does diabetes reversal work?

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

Five Steps to End a Smoking Habit

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Feb 16, 2018 10:37:00 AM

Heart disease is a largely preventable disease because many of the risk factors such as obesity, unhealthy eating habits, and lack of physical activity are within a person’s power to change.  Another controllable risk factor for heart disease is smoking.  If you are considering becoming a non-smoker, keep reading below for helpful ways to get started.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

Sleep Deprivation and Its Link to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Jan 26, 2018 11:03:00 AM

Losing sleep over sleep deprivation? On average, Americans live for approximately 75 years, of which they spend about 25 years sleeping. There is perhaps no other single activity that preoccupies a human life as much as sleep does.

Sleep is a universal trait in the animal kingdom and is likely an evolutionary survival tool. It is speculated that sleep offers adaptive inactivity to ensure that species are not active and exposed to predators when they are most vulnerable. Other theories include energy conservation theory, restorative theory (time for the brain to repair itself) and brain plasticity theory (sleep correlated to bodily changes such as growing children needing more sleep than grown adults). Although there is no consistent empirical data to pin any of these theories to the evolutionary purpose of sleep, biological truth about the purpose of sleep is likely hidden among all of these theories. What we do know, is that sleep is not, however, a state of unconsciousness as envisioned in the early days, but is a highly metabolically active state.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

“Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork???”

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Nov 24, 2017 9:05:00 AM

Recently, I attended the Cardiometabolic Health Congress in Boston and had the opportunity to sit in on a talk given by an interventional cardiologist, Stephen Devries MD, FACC from Gaples Institute of Integrative Cardiology in Deerfield, IL. His presentation was titled “Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork.” I went into the presentation expecting to learn about the new developments in interventional cardiology and how diagnostic testing may be beneficial to an interventional cardiologist. Instead, I was subjected to the idea that the most effective tool in the hands of an interventional cardiologist is, in fact, non-FDA regulated therapeutic agents such as blueberries, spinach, salmon and olive oil. Sure, growing up we are all told to eat our veggies and limit our candy consumption, but an interventional cardiologist rolling out these time tested clichés as interventional therapy? This was surprising.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

Diabetes – The Problem

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Jun 15, 2017 11:30:00 AM

Right now there is a national effort to prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes in the U.S has been increasing throughout the decades and is expected to continue increasing significantly. 29 million people have type 2 diabetes—that’s 1 out of 11 people.1

Even more concerning is that 86 million U.S adults have prediabetes, and 9 out of 10 of them don’t know they do. It’s clear that this is a big challenge we are facing, and without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.1

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Bridging the Racial Gap in Heart Disease

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Feb 24, 2017 11:00:00 AM


Each February we celebrate both Black History Month and Heart Month. This is a great opportunity to reaffirm the importance of working together as a society that fights against avoidable deaths including premature heart disease. In African Americans, avoidable deaths from premature heart disease are especially common and death from all cardiovascular disease is 33% higher than in the general population. Ethnic minority populations face barriers to heart disease diagnosis and care, receive lower quality treatment, and experience worse health outcomes than the general population. This is not acceptable, and I would like to applaud and celebrate those individuals and organizations that are working hard to help understand and bridge the racial gap in heart disease.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

Why Exercise is So Important for Diabetics

Posted by Chad Knutson, RD, CDN, CDE, CSCS on Nov 28, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Exercise can play a key role in managing diabetes in several different ways such as improved glucose uptake, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased glucose tolerance. The American Diabetes Association recommends those with prediabetes or diabetes get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 90 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. Ideally, this is at least 30 minutes 5 days per week. Let’s look more closely at how exercise can help manage pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

Giving Thanks For “Diabetes Reversal”

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Nov 10, 2016 11:35:00 AM

November is National Diabetes Month, and with Thanksgiving just ahead I’d like to express my gratitude to my patients with diabetes and prediabetes. I am tremendously fortunate to have had the privilege of working with thousands of people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes throughout my 20+ years of medical practice. Every week I see patients at the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and serve as the Medical Director for the Boston Heart Lifestyle Program serving thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes and related risk factors. I am also grateful for the opportunity to serve as a diabetes expert for WebMD, including 5 great years leading the WebMD Diabetes Community.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

Twitter Language Predicts Heart Disease Risk

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Sep 29, 2016 11:30:00 AM


This amazing study published in 20151, demonstrated that heart disease rates in a community could be predicted quite well just by looking at how positively or negatively people were expressing themselves toward others. Using anonymous data analysis, millions of Twitter phrases were used to measure the degree of positivity and negativity expressed in various counties throughout the U.S. Researchers looked for expressions of anger, frustration, and discontent, as well as expressions of happiness, and positivity. For example, the frequency of phrases that included angry curse words was particularly predictive of high rates of heart disease deaths in the same community. On the other hand, high rates of positive or optimistic phrases or words, such as “great” or “wonderful”, predicted lower death rates.

This “community attitude rating” as I will call it, was such a strong predictor of heart disease death rates, that it outperformed any other prediction measure the researchers could find. Regardless of the mix of age, ethnicity, gender, income, education or other demographics, the “community attitude rating” was the clear winner. Twitter language was even more predictive of heart disease death rates than rates of health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity in a community.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

4 Ways to Get Healthy Arteries and a Healthy Heart

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Sep 22, 2016 11:29:00 AM


 ©2015 Boston Heart Diagnostics Corporation. All rights reserved.

National cholesterol education month is a great time to review why controlling blood cholesterol levels is so important to keeping a healthy heart.  Several major risk factors for heart disease have long been identified and when present together create a perfect storm that can wreak havoc in the lining of the arteries of your heart. When cells of the lining of an artery become damaged, openings are created.  It is this initial damage that allows the excess cholesterol in your blood to enter the lining of the artery and grow into plaque. Overtime, worsening plaque narrows or blocks blood flow and can lead to a heart attack.  Preventing damage to the lining of arteries is the key to avoiding heart disease, but also to avoiding a recurring event if you already have heart disease.  Here are 4 steps you can take toward maintaining healthy arteries and a healthy heart. 

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Targeting Better Heart Disease Prevention

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Jun 2, 2016 11:32:00 AM


Great news! A recently published study highlights and strengthens the evidence supporting a key principle and effective strategy in heart disease prevention. In this study1, published by the American Diabetes Association’s peer-reviewed journal Diabetes Care, Dr. Nathan Wong and colleagues demonstrate the tremendous health benefits of cumulative cardiovascular risk factor optimization.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

Minnesota Coronary Experiment—Trying To See In A Blizzard?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 19, 2016 2:20:07 PM

I was startled last week by new research study findings that have unexpectedly “transported” me back to my own origins and fundamental assumptions. This study originated in Minnesota in the 1960’s—and so did I. The newly published results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment, conducted nearly a half-century ago, have made headlines and raised uncertainty and controversy about how dietary intake causes heart disease and atherosclerosis.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

8 Important Facts About Diabetes

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Apr 7, 2016 11:37:00 AM

Diabetes is more common than you may think. In fact, type 2 diabetes affects some 18 million Americans! That means that you, your relatives and/or your friends may have diabetes or have been affected by it in some way. But how much do you actually know about diabetes?

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

How to Avoid Diabetes

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Mar 10, 2016 11:24:00 AM

A few years ago a patient said to me, “Dominique, you act like everyone has diabetes.”  That really struck home. I had been explaining to him that he should exercise regularly (about 300 min/week) and eat a mostly plant-based diet with enough lean, heart healthy protein and occasional high-fiber grains. “That’s how my aunt has to eat,” he said. ”She has diabetes but I don’t,” he expressed. Suddenly, I realized what I had probably been recommending all along—eat as if you have diabetes and you are less likely to get it. 

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD