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Sowing Seeds of Nutrition

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Jul 6, 2018 8:45:00 AM

Looking to establish a healthy diet that includes more plant-based protein, healthy fats, and fiber? Add seeds!  Seeds are tiny plant embryos that contain the food and nutrients needed to start the growth of a plant. This makes seeds a great source of a variety of nutrients like heart-healthy fats, protein, fiber and a number of essential vitamins and minerals.  Flax, chia, and hemp seeds are plant-based sources of heart-healthy omega-3 fats which may lower the risk of heart disease by reducing inflammation in the body.  Check out this guide to seeds to learn about their individual benefits and how to incorporate them into your diet.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Could You Benefit from Breakfast?

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Jun 22, 2018 8:45:00 AM

You may have heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. So if you’re someone who typically doesn’t eat breakfast, you may be feeling like you’re doing something wrong. The truth is, there is no one size fits all approach when it comes to nutrition, and eating breakfast is no exception. Research shows that eating breakfast will not cause weight loss or weight gain. With these facts in mind you may be wondering, is breakfast right for me?

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Topics: Health and Wellness

When is Snacking a Healthy Habit?

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on May 25, 2018 8:45:00 AM

For active people, snacking between meals is often no problem at all. In fact, it may be the best thing you can do to ward off extreme hunger at meal time. Feeling over hungry just before a meal can lead to eating too quickly and eating too much.  If you are dining out in a famished state, you may order more food than you really need and your choices may be loaded with calories, sugar and unhealthy fat.  To prevent the sometimes vicious cycle of over hunger and over eating at meals, consider these tips for snacking.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

The Health Benefits of Eating Fish

Posted by Emily Luxford MS, RDN, IFNCP on May 11, 2018 8:51:00 AM

Growing up, my mom would make a deal with my sister and me when it came to clothes shopping. She had to like our clothes because she was paying for them and we had to like the clothes because we were wearing them. I recommend a similar approach to my clients about their food choices. You should choose food that serves you in two ways—a food that your body appreciates, and a food that you enjoy eating.

Fish is on my ‘enjoy’ list—perhaps you enjoy eating fish as well or maybe you are simply curious about its benefits. Let me show you how fish benefits your body.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Overcoming ‘All-or-Nothing’ Thinking When it Comes to Your Diet

Posted by Jennifer Stinson, RD, LDN on Apr 27, 2018 7:37:00 AM

Have you ever thought to yourself “I did so well on my diet this week that I deserve a cheat day this weekend?”  This is a common thought of chronic dieters—the all-or-nothing way of thinking. After a long week of strict dieting, eating until feeling stuffed, or just eating because it’s there becomes a lot easier because you are exhausted. This vicious cycle of deprivation, overindulgence and guilt is tiring and it rarely leads to long term success with weight loss. You can counteract this way of thinking by focusing on moderation. Read on to discover how to find the middle ground when it comes to your eating habits and the way you think about them.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Tips to Avoid Mindless Eating

Posted by Jan Kulikowski RD, MA, LDN on Apr 13, 2018 6:50:00 AM

We live in a world of haste and instant access, and eating is no exception. Whether we are texting, driving or watching TV, we tend to multi-task while eating or snacking. Mindless eating traps are plentiful and food is around every corner. In fact, it is estimated that we make about 200 decisions a day about the foods we eat and drink. It might be time to hit the pause button and reap the benefits of eating mindfully. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Why You Should Incorporate Swimming Into Your Fitness Routine

Posted by Barbara Casaceli RDN, LDN on Apr 6, 2018 8:41:49 AM

National guidelines for a healthy heart suggest getting at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week.  Swimming is a great way to incorporate both strength building and aerobic activity into your fitness routine while going easy on the joints.  April is adult learn to swim month, and a great time to learn about the benefits of swimming and how to get started.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

How "Diabetes Reversal" Works

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Mar 27, 2018 9:21:00 AM

Do you have type 2 diabetes? Perhaps you’re at risk for it, or someone you care about has type 2 diabetes. Approximately 12% of adults have type 2 diabetes, including approximately 25% of individuals over age 65 years.1 Diabetes is a leading killer throughout the United States, and is on the rise.

But there is good news—type 2 diabetes is reversible. Although it is not currently curable, many individuals have achieved remission or near-remission of their diabetes, meaning that their blood sugar levels are normal or nearly normal without diabetes medication.2, 3  “Diabetes Reversal” is the process of working toward remission or as close to remission as possible. So, how does diabetes reversal work?

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

How to Cut Carbs the Healthy Way

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Mar 9, 2018 9:28:02 AM

Replacing traditional, refined carbs such as white breads, rice, pasta and potatoes with non-starchy vegetables not only cuts calories and processed foods out of the diet, but it is also a great way to sneak in extra vegetables. Best of all, you will add fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals in the process. Here are some ways to swap your favorite refined carbs with vegetables.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Make Way for Meatless March

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Feb 23, 2018 8:37:00 AM

Going entirely plant-based or vegan for health is becoming more and more popular.  If you are looking into testing out a plant-based diet, think about giving it a try this March. Similar to Meatless Mondays, the Meatless March movement is taking off. The idea is that during the whole month of March, you shift temporarily to an entirely plant-based diet for 31 days.  That’s correct—no meat, poultry, lamb, game, eggs, fish, shellfish or dairy products of any kind.  This can be a challenge, but also a great learning experience.  You might even notice that you feel differently.  People who have switched to plant-based eating claim the following benefits: clothes fitting better, more energy, better sleep, fewer cravings, and feeling healthier. Those are all good reasons to make the No Meat March pledge today. Read on to find helpful resources for your meatless month.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Five Steps to End a Smoking Habit

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Feb 16, 2018 10:37:00 AM

Heart disease is a largely preventable disease because many of the risk factors such as obesity, unhealthy eating habits, and lack of physical activity are within a person’s power to change.  Another controllable risk factor for heart disease is smoking.  If you are considering becoming a non-smoker, keep reading below for helpful ways to get started.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

Boston Heart Coaches' Corner—The Heart of the Matter [infographic]

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Feb 2, 2018 9:31:00 AM

February is American Heart Month. Did you know that heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States? While you cannot control some risk factors such as age, gender, and family history, there are risk factors that you may have control over. And, if you have known heart disease, you can lower your risk of having another event by taking action. Check out this [infographic] to learn about some risk factors that you may be able to control.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Coaches Corner

Sleep Deprivation and Its Link to Obesity and Metabolic Disorders

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Jan 26, 2018 11:03:00 AM

Losing sleep over sleep deprivation? On average, Americans live for approximately 75 years, of which they spend about 25 years sleeping. There is perhaps no other single activity that preoccupies a human life as much as sleep does.

Sleep is a universal trait in the animal kingdom and is likely an evolutionary survival tool. It is speculated that sleep offers adaptive inactivity to ensure that species are not active and exposed to predators when they are most vulnerable. Other theories include energy conservation theory, restorative theory (time for the brain to repair itself) and brain plasticity theory (sleep correlated to bodily changes such as growing children needing more sleep than grown adults). Although there is no consistent empirical data to pin any of these theories to the evolutionary purpose of sleep, biological truth about the purpose of sleep is likely hidden among all of these theories. What we do know, is that sleep is not, however, a state of unconsciousness as envisioned in the early days, but is a highly metabolically active state.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Five Tips for Getting Back on Track after the Holidays

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Jan 12, 2018 9:32:00 AM

Even with motivating goals and the best of intentions, keeping up with your healthy eating and exercise routine over the holidays is hard.  With all the parties come foods and drinks you wouldn’t normally have around, not to mention limited time to fit in your exercise routine.  If you feel you’ve gotten off track this last month, don’t worry!  Check out these five tips for getting back on track after the holidays.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Boston Heart Coaches' Corner—Make your New Year's Goals 'SMART' [info-graphic]

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Jan 5, 2018 10:50:00 AM

It’s the New Year, and you may be thinking about making some changes to improve your health and wellbeing. Check out this [info-graphic] to help you achieve your goals this year by making them SMART. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Coaches Corner

Sleep, a Lifestyle Factor as Important as Diet and Exercise

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Dec 29, 2017 2:28:00 PM

In a 2008 survey by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF), the average American reported sleeping an average of six hours and forty minutes on most days.  This is about two hours less than the average reported fifty years ago and about an hour less than what is currently recommended.  Why is this a concern?  Too little sleep or poor quality sleep is a risk factor for being overweight and obese, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Sleep, slumber, snooze, siesta, forty winks—no matter what you call it, it’s a major component of health and wellness.  Are you getting enough sleep?

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Clean Meat vs. Mystery Meat

Posted by Karla Guffey, MS, RD, LD, CDE, BC-ADM, CLS on Dec 15, 2017 10:24:00 AM

Not all meats are created equal, and often we choose to avoid answering questions like; “What exactly is in those chicken nuggets I had for lunch?” The problem in not answering these types of questions is that these so called “mystery meats” have multiple ingredients that have been linked to chronic diseases such as heart disease and certain cancers.  It’s time to have those often unasked questions answered, and learn tools to make healthy swaps from “mystery” to “clean” meats.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

8 Benefits of Crockpot Cooking

Posted by Stephanie Ballesteros MS, RD, LDN on Dec 1, 2017 11:05:00 AM

Today’s reality is that most of us are busy and on the go often. Between work, school, family activities and life in general, things can get overwhelming. This is where a crockpot (also called a slow cooker) can help ease meal planning and save you time and money. Typically using a crockpot involves quick prep followed by a slow cooking time. This can result in a simple, healthy, and delicious meal that’s waiting on you as soon as you walk in the door from your busy day. With a crockpot there is a wide variety of foods that you can prepare including soups, stews and casseroles.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

“Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork???”

Posted by Hari Nair, PhD on Nov 24, 2017 9:05:00 AM

Recently, I attended the Cardiometabolic Health Congress in Boston and had the opportunity to sit in on a talk given by an interventional cardiologist, Stephen Devries MD, FACC from Gaples Institute of Integrative Cardiology in Deerfield, IL. His presentation was titled “Interventional Cardiology Delivered with a Fork.” I went into the presentation expecting to learn about the new developments in interventional cardiology and how diagnostic testing may be beneficial to an interventional cardiologist. Instead, I was subjected to the idea that the most effective tool in the hands of an interventional cardiologist is, in fact, non-FDA regulated therapeutic agents such as blueberries, spinach, salmon and olive oil. Sure, growing up we are all told to eat our veggies and limit our candy consumption, but an interventional cardiologist rolling out these time tested clichés as interventional therapy? This was surprising.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

The Whole Truth About Whole Grains

Posted by Erin Langbein, RD, LD on Nov 17, 2017 9:33:00 AM

“Whole Grain” is a big buzz word in the nutrition world, and rightly so. Eating enough whole grains can help reduce your risk of stroke, heart disease, and diabetes. However, when it comes to grains, you may not know what to look for and what to avoid in order to make heart healthy choices. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Find your Zen—Common Types of Yoga and Tips for your First Class

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Nov 10, 2017 1:07:00 PM

Yoga comes from a Sanskrit word often interpreted as “union.”  While it involves eight “limbs” or aspects, most people practicing today are engaged mainly in the physical practice of postures which act to provide physical strength and stamina required for meditation.  But, within this physical practice, yoga is unique in connecting movement and activity of the mind to the rhythm of the breath to direct attention inward.  The body becomes more flexible as does the mind. 

Looking to try yoga but unsure where to begin?  No special flexibility or ability is required as there are so many types and levels of yoga available.  I’ve outlined some of the more common types you may encounter so you can choose the type you may want to pursue. Do not be afraid to speak to the yoga studio ahead of time to find a level and style of class that works best for you.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

How to Choose the Best Nut Butter without Going Nuts!

Posted by Dawn Heeke, RD, LD on Nov 3, 2017 9:37:00 AM

It seems like every day more and more nut butters are filling up the grocery store shelves, and selecting the healthiest option can be quite confusing. Compared to many other convenient foods, most nut butters are nutritious. Although some are better than others, all nut butters range from good to excellent sources of healthy fats, protein, fiber, copper, magnesium, chromium, manganese, zinc, some B vitamins, some fat soluble vitamins, and phytochemicals. In fact, eating 1-2 tablespoons of nut butter at least four times per week may lower your risk of coronary heart disease by 35% according to a pooled analysis of four U.S. epidemiological studies.1

Here’s my personal criteria that you can follow to choose the best nut butters on the market and reduce your risk for heart disease.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Getting Healthy is a Family Affair

Posted by Erin Langbein, RD, LD on Oct 27, 2017 9:37:00 AM

As parents, we want our kids to be happy and healthy. At times, that may mean we put our own health on the backburner. But, it is important to remember that you are the biggest influence in your child’s life. When you make smart choices about food, exercise, and stress management, you set a great example. Start with these simple family health tips to set goals you and your family can enjoy reaching together.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Chickpea Creations

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Oct 20, 2017 12:09:00 PM

Hi Everyone!  Welcome back to In the Kitchen with Caitlin, a blog series where I feature some lesser known ingredients and highlight ways to use them in delicious and healthy recipes. Today, I am going to show you how to make two delicious snack recipes that use the same ingredient in two very different ways. The featured ingredient is the garbanzo bean. You may already be familiar with garbanzo beans, but perhaps you aren’t aware of the many different ways you could use them. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Power Up with Plant Protein: Fresh Ideas for Eating Plant Based

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Oct 13, 2017 8:48:00 AM

Not so long ago, you would not have been able to find items such as tofu, veggie burgers or plant-based milks on supermarket shelves. With a move toward plant-based eating, these products are now widely available. Why the shift? A growing body of research supporting the replacement of animal proteins with plant-based options for health has fueled this change.  Plant-based diets have been linked to lower risks of heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers.1 In addition, food sustainability benefits have also been well documented.2  

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Vegetarianism and How to Get Started

Posted by Jan Kulikowski RD, MA, LDN on Oct 6, 2017 9:15:00 AM

Thinking of becoming a vegetarian? October is Vegetarian Awareness month and a good time to learn about what it takes to become vegetarian and why you might want to consider it. Read on to learn about various levels of vegetarian diets, the benefits of going meatless and ways to ease into eating vegetarian.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Fueling for your First 5k

Posted by Stephanie Ballesteros MS, RD, LDN on Sep 29, 2017 10:12:00 AM

You've spent a lot of time debating if you had it in you to conquer your first 5K race but you've decided to accept the challenge! Now that you've signed up, you may have started to log your miles and your race day is quickly approaching. As you're getting started, you may have several concerns on your mind like "Where do I start?”

Before starting a running plan, there are many aspects of this sport to consider like:

  • Do you have a training plan that works with your schedule?

  • Do you have the proper attire for running?

  • Do you have a good support team in place?

And the most important question that is often overlooked;

  • Have you thought about how you will fuel your body?
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Topics: Health and Wellness

What’s New about the New Nutrition Facts Food Label?

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Sep 22, 2017 10:37:00 AM

As a nutritionist and a diabetes expert, I am very pleased that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is making a welcomed change to the nutrition facts label. Some companies have already started implementing the changes, so now is a good time to point out what’s new and improved on the label. I’ve highlighted some of the major changes below.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Batch Cooking Part 2

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Sep 15, 2017 11:07:00 AM

For those of you unfamiliar with the process, roasting vegetables is when you take your favorite variety of vegetables, spread them in a single layer on a baking sheet, lightly drizzle them with oil, and season to taste. The roasting process brings out the natural flavors of the vegetables and makes them slightly crispy on the outside but tender on the inside. (A great mouth-feel!) I have yet to come across a vegetable I haven’t enjoyed roasted. From root veggies like sweet potatoes and parsnip to summer veggies like zucchini and tomatoes; you really can’t go wrong. Because there are so many options, an added bonus to roasting vegetables is that is can be pretty economical. You can purchase what’s on sale and be confident that you’ll enjoy the taste. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Batch Cooking

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Sep 8, 2017 12:15:00 PM

Like most people, I need every minute I can spare, and batch cooking allows me to significantly cut down on the time it takes to prepare meals.  Instead of dinner prep taking anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour, I can have a nutritious and delicious dinner on the table in 15 minutes or less!  Batch cooking can also help you to stay on track with your health goals.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Five Meditation Apps to Calm your Mind

Posted by Tayler Bessette on Sep 1, 2017 10:03:00 AM


Meditation is often viewed as a lengthy session of sitting silently, legs crossed, eyes closed with arms and hands extended, but more often than not, it is emotional and dynamic.

To meditate, as defined in the Merriam-Webster dictionary is “to engage in contemplation or reflection” or “to engage in mental exercise (such as concentration on one's breathing or repetition of a mantra) for the purpose of reaching a heightened level of spiritual awareness.”

Meditation practice has been proven to help reduce anxiety and stress, improve focus and mood, and help with sleep problems. If you are not sure how to meditate or are just curious about how to get started, there are many apps available for smartphones that can help guide you.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Time Saving Meal Solutions for a Busy Lifestyle

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Aug 25, 2017 11:30:00 AM


For many adults, finding time to grocery shop, prepare meals and cook for a family can be daunting. You may not feel confident in your cooking skills, lack the time for meal planning and preparation, or just hate the idea of grocery shopping or cooking in general. Whether you are looking to eat healthier, or just want to save time there are some great options out there for you. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Rethink your Drink!—5 Reasons to Avoid Artificially Sweetened Beverages

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Aug 18, 2017 10:50:00 AM


“To lose weight, cut out the sugar-filled beverages and substitute with diet drinks.”  This statement makes sense to most Americans. However, a recent
study found the opposite. Artificial sweeteners were not helpful in the battle of losing weight and routine consumption may be associated with increased risk for diabetes and heart disease.  Researchers think that artificial sweeteners have a negative effect on our metabolism and our healthy intestinal microbiome. It’s also thought that the very sweet-tasting nature of artificial sweeteners makes people crave even more sweet foods and therefore leads to excess calories and weight gain. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

It’s Time to Unwind—5 Natural Ways to Relax

Posted by Becky Morgan, MHA on Aug 11, 2017 10:50:00 AM

The summer season is often busy and hectic. Vacations, weddings, cookouts, sports games…it can sometimes feel like you’re constantly on the go. Taking the time to slow down and relax will help to prevent you from getting overly stressed, tired, and rundown.

In support of National Relaxation Day on Tuesday August 15, here are five natural ways you can relax.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Fighting Food Guilt

Posted by Karla Guffey, MS, RD, LD, CDE, BC-ADM, CLS on Aug 4, 2017 9:07:00 AM

Have you ever been derailed by cheating on your diet or healthy eating plan?  Have the feelings of guilt overwhelmed you? If so, you are not alone. It’s easy to fall into a love-hate relationship with food. We are constantly inundated with information about food—trends, cures, and risks. So when you do go astray, you may find yourself overcome with guilt. This mindset is often referred to as “food guilt.”  To a certain extent, some food guilt is normal, but when it consumes your thoughts it can lead to disordered eating patterns.  Here are a few techniques to fight food guilt.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Keeping up with your Health Goals While on Vacation

Posted by Dawn Heeke, RD, LD on Jul 28, 2017 11:12:00 AM

You have been eating healthier and exercising regularly the past six weeks. It took a while to get started, but you did and you’re feeling comfortable, in a routine, and reaping the rewards. You feel better than you have in a long time when….BOOM!  It’s time to go on vacation and you are worried about getting off track.  Does this sound familiar?  If so, worry no more and consider these tips for success.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Superfoods for a Super Summer [Infographic]

Posted by Danielle Caron on Jul 21, 2017 9:47:00 AM

Summer weather is officially here and that means it is peak season for many fruit and vegetable superfoods. A superfood is a, “nutrient powerhouse,” meaning they are packed with large amounts of antioxidants, polyphenols, vitamins and minerals that can help improve overall health and well-being when consumed regularly. If you’re wondering which fruit and veggie superfoods to add to your next grocery list, take a look at this [infographic] for some suggestions and the health benefits they provide.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Celebrate the Season—5 Tips to Stay On Track During Cookout Season

Posted by Kayce Boggs on Jul 14, 2017 1:26:00 PM

 

Summer cookouts and picnics are a popular way to enjoy the summer season, but that doesn’t mean that unhealthy temptations need to get in the way of your health goals. Here are a few ways to make your next cookout or picnic healthy and delicious.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

8 Outdoor Exercises to Try this Summer [Infographic]

Posted by Danielle Caron on Jul 7, 2017 10:42:00 AM

The summer months are here and that means it's a great time to get outside and enjoy the warmer weather. There are many exercises you can do outdoors that contribute to a healthy, active lifestyle. This summer, ditch your indoor fitness routine and try these refreshing outdoor exercises instead!

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Topics: Health and Wellness

The Five Stages of Change—How to Succeed in Making Lifestyle Changes that Last

Posted by Jennifer Stinson, RD, LDN on Jun 30, 2017 10:24:00 AM

We’ve all tried to make changes in our lives, right? Whether it’s quitting smoking, eating less, exercising more or learning a new skill, chances are you went through these stages of change and may not have even known it!

Check out these five stages of change and learn how to reach success with your goals.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Get Fresh!—Summer is a Great Time to Start Eating More Fresh Produce

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Jun 23, 2017 11:46:00 AM

June is national fresh fruit and vegetable month and a great time to start eating more produce. Connecting with local farms, farmers markets or a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) farm can make getting fresh and seasonal produce easy.  Check out these “fresh” suggestions for purchasing and preparing fresh fruit and vegetables this summer.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Diabetes – The Problem

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Jun 15, 2017 11:30:00 AM

Right now there is a national effort to prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes in the U.S has been increasing throughout the decades and is expected to continue increasing significantly. 29 million people have type 2 diabetes—that’s 1 out of 11 people.1

Even more concerning is that 86 million U.S adults have prediabetes, and 9 out of 10 of them don’t know they do. It’s clear that this is a big challenge we are facing, and without weight loss and moderate physical activity, 15-30% of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years.1

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Four Lifestyle Factors That Can Reduce Your Risk For CVD

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on May 18, 2017 11:30:00 PM

Eating right and regularly exercising are not the only ways to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. These four lifestyle factors play an essential role as well.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Why Water Belongs in your Lifestyle [Infographic]

Posted by Becky Morgan, MHA on May 4, 2017 12:30:00 PM

Our bodies are made up of 60% water, so it's important that we are drinking it each day. There are many added benefits to drinking water, check out this [infographic] to learn more.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Mediterranean Diet Improves Heart Risk and HDL Function

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 20, 2017 11:30:00 AM


The Mediterranean Diet is a proven eating strategy for good heart health. A recent study shows the health benefits may be partly due to improvements in HDL particle function.1

What is HDL particle function and why is this important?

 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Health Management Apps to Help You Meet Your Health Goals

Posted by Becky Morgan, MHA on Apr 6, 2017 11:30:00 AM


It’s hard not to feel overwhelmed when setting new lifestyle goals. You might need help getting started, help with motivation along the way, or additional support to keep you on track. The good news, there’s an app for that. There are plenty of health apps that can be downloaded to your smartphone that are designed to help you meet your goals. I bet you’re wondering, how do I know which app is right for me?

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Southern Diet Made Heart Healthy

Posted by Qula Madkin, MS, RD, LD, CDE on Mar 23, 2017 11:00:00 AM


Recently, the American College of Cardiology released a comprehensive review of foods and diets. 1 Included in this review, people were advised to avoid a Southern diet due to evidence that it negatively impacts cardiovascular health. The Southern diet is typically high in added fats and oils, fried foods, eggs, organ and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened drinks. While this report provides great information for healthy living, it doesn’t do much for my Southern palate.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Incorporating Frozen Fruit

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Mar 10, 2017 10:30:00 AM


Hi Everyone!  Welcome back to In the Kitchen with Caitlin, a blog series where I feature some lesser known ingredients and highlight ways to use them in delicious and healthy recipes.  Did you know March is National Frozen Food Month?  No?  Well, don’t feel bad, I didn’t either until just recently.  In honor of National Frozen Food Month, I’m going to blog about how to build a nutritious and delicious smoothie.  Smoothies are a great way to save some money on fruit by buying frozen.  I love having frozen fruit on hand because unlike fresh, it is picked in season and flash frozen so the flavors are great any time of year.  Also, frozen fruit, unlike canned, is typically frozen without any added sugar or juice so you’re just getting the fruit itself.  Lastly, keeping frozen fruit on hand means you don’t have to worry about it spoiling.  If you live alone, you may be deterred from buying fruit because it tends to spoil before you get a chance to eat it all, with frozen fruit you don’t have to worry about that!

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Bridging the Racial Gap in Heart Disease

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Feb 24, 2017 11:00:00 AM


Each February we celebrate both Black History Month and Heart Month. This is a great opportunity to reaffirm the importance of working together as a society that fights against avoidable deaths including premature heart disease. In African Americans, avoidable deaths from premature heart disease are especially common and death from all cardiovascular disease is 33% higher than in the general population. Ethnic minority populations face barriers to heart disease diagnosis and care, receive lower quality treatment, and experience worse health outcomes than the general population. This is not acceptable, and I would like to applaud and celebrate those individuals and organizations that are working hard to help understand and bridge the racial gap in heart disease.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

Playing the Hand You’re Dealt: Genetics vs. Lifestyle Choices

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Feb 23, 2017 10:01:00 AM

I recently read about a new Healthy Lifestyle study in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine.1  When a top medical journal reports such a study it tends to strongly influence the way doctors and other experts think about the value of “Lifestyle Medicine.” I’m excited to declare that the new findings strongly support the critically important role of healthy lifestyle habits for preventing premature cardiovascular disease, especially in people with an increased “genetic risk.”

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

“It’s OK. It’s good for you”

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Feb 14, 2017 12:00:00 PM


“Not that one….get the one that’s 70% or higher,” are words of wisdom when it comes to chocolate!  Chemicals called polyphenols found in the cocoa of chocolate have tremendous health benefits.  Flavanols and flavanoids are sub-categories of polyphenols that act as antioxidants in the body. They have been shown to cause dilatation of the arteries (meaning the arteries become wider) by increasing a substance called nitric oxide. When nitric oxide is released, the arteries open up and blood pressure goes down.1 Studies show that cocoa intake can reduce blood pressure by 2-3 mm/hg. What if we combined modest exercise (30-40 mins/day), which lowers systolic blood pressure by 4-9 mm/hg, with cocoa polyphenols? 2,3 There are no clinical studies to tell us what the combination would do, but sometimes it’s the little changes that cause dramatic effects.  

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Topics: Health and Wellness

NLA Guidelines – Sorting Fact from Fiction

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Feb 9, 2017 10:34:00 AM

With nutrition information everywhere, it can be hard to tell fact from fiction.  Scientific breakthroughs happen from time to time, but they are very rarely “breakthrough” despite the sensational news headlines.  Making sense of these exaggerated news bites can be difficult for most.  In fact, the National Lipid Association, a well-respected organization of scientific professionals, just released their version of nutrition education materials1 to help healthcare providers help patients make better nutrition choices.   This marks a significant step forward in combatting nutrition mythology and in helping healthcare professionals provide legitimate nutrition education to their patients. 

I’ve always believed in the KISS principle (Keep It Simple Silly).   There is lots of sound information out there that is well supported by research, but we also see a lot of not so great or even downright harmful information being passed around.  Here are a few strategies I have shared with my clients over the years to help them detect the truth from the fiction:

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Topics: Clinical and Science

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Cooking with Chia and Flaxseeds

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Jan 19, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Today I am introducing two special ingredients, chia and flaxseeds.  While small in size, these seeds pack a big nutritional punch. You may have heard of these seeds before—maybe you even have some deep inside your pantry or freezer.  Well, now’s the time to pull them out and learn a little more about why they are so good for you!

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Mind Over Matter – The Key to Lasting Change

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Jan 3, 2017 8:00:00 AM

In my work with people to help them learn about healthy foods and eating, it is clear that the focus on behavior change extends well beyond the food.  Yes, learning about food labels, nutrients, and meal planning is key, but implementing behavior change is often the struggle.  The expression “mind over matter” really is true as many of us know what to do, we just cannot seem to do it. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

7 Tips for Sticking to Your Diet During the Holiday Season

Posted by Karla Guffey, MS, RD, LD, CDE, BC-ADM, CLS on Dec 22, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Why are the holidays such a struggle to maintain our weight?  The season provides an overabundance of high-fat, high-calorie foods, and drinks in large portions.  In fact, the traditional Thanksgiving meal of turkey, stuffing, casseroles and desserts typically provides about 3000 calories in one sitting.  In addition to excessive portion sizes of high-calorie foods, we tend to decrease our physical activity and put ourselves in highly emotional or stressful situations.  Did you know that the average American gains about 1 pound from Thanksgiving to New Years?1  This may not seem significant, but the weight is usually not lost over the next year and can add up over time.1  So how can we make this year healthier than years past? 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

10 Foods to Eat to Get Your Cholesterol to Green

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Dec 15, 2016 10:38:00 AM

When it comes to cholesterol lowering diets, there has been much more information on WHAT NOT to eat—bacon, cheese, ice cream, pastries-- and not enough information on WHAT TO eat!

Read on to get some great tips on foods that are delicious AND beneficial when it comes to improving your blood cholesterol and reducing your risk for cardiovascular disease.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Holiday Stress.  How to Keep Your Cool… and Your Heart Health

Posted by Erin Langbein, RD, LD on Dec 1, 2016 8:00:00 AM

Did you know that the winter months, particularly December, have the highest incidents of heart attacks?1  While this could be attributed to the time of year and overindulgence, emotional stress is also believed to be a major factor.  Stress is your mind-body response to the thrills and challenges of the world around you. It can come and go quickly (acute stress). Stress can also drag on for years and feel like intense anxiety (chronic stress). When you’re stressed, your body jumpstarts the “fight or flight” response as a reaction to perceived danger. Before you even have a chance to mentally process what’s happening, your body is preparing to enter a fist fight with a shark, or send you running from a spider.

While you can’t eliminate all causes of stress in your life, you can better understand your mind-body response and how to handle it.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Why Exercise is So Important for Diabetics

Posted by Chad Knutson, RD, CDN, CDE, CSCS on Nov 28, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Exercise can play a key role in managing diabetes in several different ways such as improved glucose uptake, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased glucose tolerance. The American Diabetes Association recommends those with prediabetes or diabetes get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 90 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. Ideally, this is at least 30 minutes 5 days per week. Let’s look more closely at how exercise can help manage pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness

In the Kitchen with Caitlin—Cooking with Thanksgiving Leftovers

Posted by Caitlin Quinn Dunn, MS, RD, LDN on Nov 23, 2016 10:00:00 AM

Welcome to In the Kitchen with Caitlin, a blog where I take you through ways to use ingredients to create healthy and delicious meals.  With the holiday season fast approaching, I wanted to write a Thanksgiving blog, but with a twist.  I could write about ways to make a healthier dinner, but we’ve done that before!  What I haven’t ever done is explored healthier ways to use Thanksgiving leftovers.  So that’s what I’m doing today!  While many people view Thanksgiving as an unhealthy holiday filled with rich gravy, starchy vegetables, and creamy casseroles, the basics of the meal are lean protein and vegetables.  My intention for this blog is to highlight the healthy portions of the meal and walk you through two ways to use those ingredients to create satisfying meals to get you back on track after the big day has passed.  The recipes featured today are shepherd’s pie and turkey and wild rice soup.  

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Quitting Tobacco – Practice Makes Perfect

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Nov 17, 2016 10:30:00 AM


As it is Great American Smokeout Day, it is important to raise awareness that people trying to quit smoking often feel a lot of shame around failed attempts.  Reframing multiple quit attempts as practice for eventual success instead of submission to multiple failures can have an enlightening effect on someone trying to quit.  Understanding these challenges and some tobacco myths and half-truths can help people get closer to quitting smoking for good.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Giving Thanks For “Diabetes Reversal”

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Nov 10, 2016 11:35:00 AM

November is National Diabetes Month, and with Thanksgiving just ahead I’d like to express my gratitude to my patients with diabetes and prediabetes. I am tremendously fortunate to have had the privilege of working with thousands of people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes throughout my 20+ years of medical practice. Every week I see patients at the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, and serve as the Medical Director for the Boston Heart Lifestyle Program serving thousands of patients with type 2 diabetes and related risk factors. I am also grateful for the opportunity to serve as a diabetes expert for WebMD, including 5 great years leading the WebMD Diabetes Community.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

6 Steps to Starting a Weight Loss Program that is Sustainable

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Oct 27, 2016 11:30:00 AM


The quote by Lao Tzu, “the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step” is often associated with making lifestyle changes.   This connection is appropriate as it can be extremely difficult to change lifelong habits that may have contributed to obesity, ill health and disease risk. Tzu also instills a sense of hope that one single step is a beginning for change and that changing old habits is a journey and not something achievable overnight. 

Weight loss is most likely the best lifestyle medicine for reducing heart disease risk because it can lead to a lower blood pressure and improved diagnostic test results related to heart disease.1  Weight loss is also important for reducing risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome because excess fat on the body can lead to insulin resistance and higher blood sugars.  Since being overweight (over “fat”) plays a prominent role as a risk factor for the most common chronic diseases, it makes sense to begin the journey to better health by losing weight. 

Begin your weight loss journey with one of these six steps.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

What You Should Be Eating... But Likely Aren't

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Oct 13, 2016 11:38:00 AM

“Don’t eat this, don’t eat that.” This seems to be the most popular way to give diet advice. But, why not
turn this around and give advice by suggesting “Eat this, eat that, and here’s why.” It’s time to focus on
what foods are best to eat to achieve an overall healthy diet that can help keep your heart healthy and
your cholesterol levels in check.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Twitter Language Predicts Heart Disease Risk

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Sep 29, 2016 11:30:00 AM


This amazing study published in 20151, demonstrated that heart disease rates in a community could be predicted quite well just by looking at how positively or negatively people were expressing themselves toward others. Using anonymous data analysis, millions of Twitter phrases were used to measure the degree of positivity and negativity expressed in various counties throughout the U.S. Researchers looked for expressions of anger, frustration, and discontent, as well as expressions of happiness, and positivity. For example, the frequency of phrases that included angry curse words was particularly predictive of high rates of heart disease deaths in the same community. On the other hand, high rates of positive or optimistic phrases or words, such as “great” or “wonderful”, predicted lower death rates.

This “community attitude rating” as I will call it, was such a strong predictor of heart disease death rates, that it outperformed any other prediction measure the researchers could find. Regardless of the mix of age, ethnicity, gender, income, education or other demographics, the “community attitude rating” was the clear winner. Twitter language was even more predictive of heart disease death rates than rates of health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or obesity in a community.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

4 Ways to Get Healthy Arteries and a Healthy Heart

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Sep 22, 2016 11:29:00 AM


 ©2015 Boston Heart Diagnostics Corporation. All rights reserved.

National cholesterol education month is a great time to review why controlling blood cholesterol levels is so important to keeping a healthy heart.  Several major risk factors for heart disease have long been identified and when present together create a perfect storm that can wreak havoc in the lining of the arteries of your heart. When cells of the lining of an artery become damaged, openings are created.  It is this initial damage that allows the excess cholesterol in your blood to enter the lining of the artery and grow into plaque. Overtime, worsening plaque narrows or blocks blood flow and can lead to a heart attack.  Preventing damage to the lining of arteries is the key to avoiding heart disease, but also to avoiding a recurring event if you already have heart disease.  Here are 4 steps you can take toward maintaining healthy arteries and a healthy heart. 

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

How to Reduce Your Sugar Intake [Infographic]

Posted by Caroline Hoffman, MS, RD, CDE on Sep 15, 2016 11:14:00 AM

Recent headlines suggest the sugar industry may have influenced researchers to publish articles to minimize the effects of sugar on heart health and instead, shift the attention to saturated fat as the culprit for heart disease1.  Today, the scientific industry is looking more closely at sugar, in fact, in January the U.S. Dietary Guidelines were released with a new recommendation to consume less than 10% of your calories from added sugars.    So what do these guidelines mean for your diet and how can you reduce your sugar intake?

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

A Healthy Waist is Less than Half Your Height

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Sep 8, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Leonardo da Vinci’s globally recognized illustration “Vitruvian Man”, created around 1490 AD, is an inspirational reminder that human bodies are amazingly symmetrical, beautiful and functional. For example, human arm span is the same length as body height, forming a square in his illustration. At the center of a circle, circumscribed by outstretched arms and legs, is the navel. The navel is also located at the “golden ratio” point along the human body. The golden ratio, a measure of symmetry and natural beauty famous among mathematicians and architects (symbolized by the Greek letter phi), can be found throughout the body when analyzing the lengths of related body parts, body dimensions, and facial features. In fact, symmetry and special ratios can be found throughout the natural world, and in the physical laws of nature and the universe.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

How a Coach Can Help You Reach Your Health Goals

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Sep 1, 2016 11:00:00 AM

September is National Cholesterol Education Month.  It’s a great time to check out your cholesterol numbers – and if need be – to get them under control. If it turns out you need help lowering your cholesterol levels your healthcare provider may recommend a medication, however, don’t overlook the impact lifestyle changes can have on your health.  You may be able to lower your cholesterol levels through diet and exercise—working with a health coach is a great way to make long lasting lifestyle changes sustainable.  Here are some of the many benefits to working with a health coach:

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Do You Really Know What is Healthy for You to Eat?

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Aug 11, 2016 11:18:00 AM


An interesting survey by the New York Times was conducted recently that caught my attention.  The survey data were used to compare the opinions of expert nutritionists with the opinions of the general public about the healthfulness of a variety of foods.  Results of the survey demonstrated a number of differences between the way the public and nutritionists rated several foods.  For example, over 70% of the public felt granola bars were healthy, whereas only 30% of nutritionists felt the same.  Why is there a difference of opinion?

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Should You be Taking CoQ10?

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jul 28, 2016 2:39:04 PM

CO…what???  That’s a common response when I ask a patient to start taking Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone (or in activated form ubiquinol)!  Yes CoQ10 has a funny name but your body needs it to produce energy in every cell. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

5 Ways to Increase Your Hidden Superhero (HDL Cholesterol)

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD & Kristy Consalvo, MBA on Jul 14, 2016 11:20:00 AM

Have you ever felt you have a superpower inside of you? Well, you do! Every single one of us does—it’s our High Density Lipoprotein (HDL).  What makes HDL a superpower? HDL particles in the blood- helps to clear out excess cholesterol from your arteries helping to reduce your risk of forming a blockage which could lead to a heart attack or stroke.1

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

Ditch the Quick Fix Diet And Set Yourself Up for Success

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Jun 30, 2016 11:32:00 AM

“Lose 10 pounds in 10 days!” Wow, that sounds amazing!  Who wouldn’t want to try that? Practically everyone could restrict their calories for 10 days.  But, the plain truth is that the very low calorie approach needed to achieve this type of rapid weight loss is difficult to maintain for very long and might be unhealthy.  Also, the weight that you lose is mostly water along with a mix of your precious lean tissue (muscles) and some body fat.  Then, after you suffer through the 10 days, you return to your previous way of eating only to quickly gain back the ten pounds and possibly more. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

6 Ways to Eat Mindfully

Posted by Debanjali Ghosh, MA on Jun 16, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Food is our primary life source. It’s delicious, powerful, has the ability to prevent and cause disease, and can make us simultaneously feel in and out of control.  Unfortunately, over time, we have cultivated dysfunctional relationships with food. These relationships, however, do not have to be permanent. Incorporating mindful practices into your eating provides you with opportunities to learn, grow, and love the way that you eat on a daily basis! Eating mindfully can help you find what works for you as an individual and encourage you to embrace a sustainable lifestyle. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Targeting Better Heart Disease Prevention

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Jun 2, 2016 11:32:00 AM


Great news! A recently published study highlights and strengthens the evidence supporting a key principle and effective strategy in heart disease prevention. In this study1, published by the American Diabetes Association’s peer-reviewed journal Diabetes Care, Dr. Nathan Wong and colleagues demonstrate the tremendous health benefits of cumulative cardiovascular risk factor optimization.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

Redefining “Healthy” – A Welcome Change for Nutrition Labels

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on May 19, 2016 11:28:00 AM


When choosing foods, what does the word “healthy” on the label mean to you?  Last week the Food & Drug Administration’s (FDA) labeling rules and regulations were in the news because of new thinking about an outdated definition for the food label claim, “healthy.”  In the 1990s when “healthy” was defined, it was mostly based on a food being low in fat – regardless of the type of fat. At the time, the amount of sugar wasn’t even considered!   

Fast forward twenty years and we now know much more about nutrition and what makes a food healthy or not healthy.  At the same time, food label claims are becoming more and more important, because people are seeking and choosing products that will have positive health benefits. Current food package definitions including “healthy” are often misleading to consumers and persuade them to make unhealthy choices. The fact that the FDA will be rethinking their modern definition of healthy is welcome news. In addition, proposals to improve the nutrition facts panel include making the serving size and calorie information more prominent and providing the gram amounts per serving for added sugars. While the FDA is working to redefine healthy, here are some quick and easy tips you can use to make healthy choices.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

How Important is Exercise to Your Overall Health?

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on May 5, 2016 11:28:00 AM

Recently, I read a blog suggesting that exercise isn’t as important for weight loss as a healthy diet. I can’t argue the fact that a healthy diet, with just enough calories and a good balance of carbohydrates, proteins and fats is important if you are trying to lose weight.  However, if you think you can skip your workout because you eat healthy, think again!

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Topics: Health and Wellness

5 Tips to Keep You Motivated to Exercise

Posted by Briana Jones, RN, BSN on Apr 22, 2016 9:05:15 AM

The third Monday in April is Patriot’s Day in Massachusetts, but ever since I moved to Boston 10 years ago I’ve thought of it as “Marathon Monday.” Every year I look forward to cheering on the runners, whether it’s humid and 90 degrees or 40 degrees and pouring rain. Whether you’re a runner or a fan, it’s easy to be motivated by the Boston Marathon. Maybe it’s the thousands of people running for charity, the site of the most elite runners in the world, or the amazing Hoyt family, but I don’t have to look hard at the Boston Marathon to be inspired. I walk away from the Marathon every year determined to exercise more regularly and improve my fitness and strength. This year was no different than the others. On April 18, I left the Boston Marathon with renewed energy towards my fitness routine.

In the past, I have managed to stick with my regimen for a few months. And even though the benefits of regular exercise, including decreased risk of heart disease and diabetes, cannot be overstated, I find staying on track can be hard, especially during the summer.

If you struggle with consistency in your exercise, you’re not alone. Most people want to exercise and have great intentions, but life often gets in the way. So how can we improve? 

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Topics: Health and Wellness

Minnesota Coronary Experiment—Trying To See In A Blizzard?

Posted by Michael Dansinger, MD on Apr 19, 2016 2:20:07 PM

I was startled last week by new research study findings that have unexpectedly “transported” me back to my own origins and fundamental assumptions. This study originated in Minnesota in the 1960’s—and so did I. The newly published results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment, conducted nearly a half-century ago, have made headlines and raised uncertainty and controversy about how dietary intake causes heart disease and atherosclerosis.

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD, Clinical and Science

8 Important Facts About Diabetes

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Apr 7, 2016 11:37:00 AM

Diabetes is more common than you may think. In fact, type 2 diabetes affects some 18 million Americans! That means that you, your relatives and/or your friends may have diabetes or have been affected by it in some way. But how much do you actually know about diabetes?

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

Having a Heart to Heart with Your Parents

Posted by Victoria Smiley on Mar 24, 2016 11:35:00 AM

Growing up in North Carolina, I can tell you that nothing is better than mom’s fried chicken and buttermilk biscuits with a cold, refreshing glass of sweet tea. Now that I’m a little older, I realize these foods are not the best for my heart health. I also understand that my parents are growing older too and continue to make these high fat and sugary foods a regular part of their diet. Speaking with them about their choices and daily habits can be intimidating, but I want them to understand that the choices they make every day have a lasting effect on their heart and overall health. So what is important for me to tell them and what is the best way to get the point across?

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Topics: Health and Wellness

How to Avoid Diabetes

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Mar 10, 2016 11:24:00 AM

A few years ago a patient said to me, “Dominique, you act like everyone has diabetes.”  That really struck home. I had been explaining to him that he should exercise regularly (about 300 min/week) and eat a mostly plant-based diet with enough lean, heart healthy protein and occasional high-fiber grains. “That’s how my aunt has to eat,” he said. ”She has diabetes but I don’t,” he expressed. Suddenly, I realized what I had probably been recommending all along—eat as if you have diabetes and you are less likely to get it. 

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Topics: About Stroke, Diabetes and CVD

5 Facts About Dietary Cholesterol

Posted by Joi Gleason, RD, LDN, CHWC on Feb 25, 2016 11:25:00 AM


After years of avoiding steak, eggs and ice cream as part your quest for maintaining good cholesterol levels, now you are finding yourself ready to indulge.  Are the new guidelines too good to be true?  Consider these 5 undisputable facts before you add more butter to your bread.

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

The Best Diet Isn’t a Diet at All But a Healthy ‘Eating Pattern’

Posted by Dominique Adair, MS, RD, CLS, TTS on Feb 11, 2016 11:30:00 AM

Eat less fat! No, eat more fat but only the right kinds! Wait! Eat low glycemic, high fiber, three meals, six meals, no, graze all day long!   All this nutrition information is ripe with plenty of good advice but also a lot of contradictions and myths. Sorting it out can be extremely confusing.

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Topics: Health and Wellness

How to Buy Supplements: 5 Rules of the Road...

Posted by Peggy G. Daly, ND, FNP-BC, FNMM, ABAAHP, MBA on Jan 28, 2016 11:30:00 AM

                      Photo Credit:Niloo/Shutterstock.com

When my patients ask about buying a supplement suggested in the office, a LONG, passionate conversation ensues! But don’t worry, I’ll save you time and boil it down to 5 main rules on how to buy supplements. 

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Topics: Health and Wellness, Clinical and Science

How I Lost Over 100 Pounds Following 6 Simple Rules

Posted by Guest: Russ J. on Jan 14, 2016 6:00:00 AM


Photo Credit: Robert X. Forgarty from “Dear World”

Only 19 more pounds to go and I’ll have lost a total of 140 pounds since May, 2014. I’ve been doing the Boston Heart Lifestyle Program exactly that long. When I started my journey, I weighed nearly 400 pounds. I’ve gone from a size 55 waist to size 40. It’s a pure thrill for me to be able to walk into any retail store and find clothes my size.  I’m happy and healthy with a steady diet of fish, veggies and fruit.  How did I do it?

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Topics: Health and Wellness